Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge - Foods and Brews

Disneyland Park, Anaheim, CA

Bright suns! Or Rising Moons! Or… well, I guess it depends on what time you’re reading this. After a brief interlude of Knott’s and artsy updates, we’re back at Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, for another in-depth look at some of the features and offerings of Batuu, that former interstellar hub that has become an off-the-beaten-route haven for adventurers and smugglers and those who don’t wish to be found. Or maybe it’s just a place people visit because it’s so damn beautiful.

In any case, with all these visitors and even more to come starting next Monday, a planet like this certainly needs to feed its guests, and to that end, the Black Spire Outpost has plenty of great refreshments and nutrition to offer. Each food and beverage spot has some sort of draw or attraction to offer, and today, we’re going to look at each one. So set your appetites to stun. It’s time to explore the eats and drinks of Galaxy’s Edge!

Oga’s Cantina

Naturally, we’re kicking it off with the watering hole that is an attraction in and of itself. Oga’s Cantina is a high demand, low capacity bar that echoes some of the vibes of Mos Eisley Cantina, but with more concoctions, less bands, and plenty of wait. During the little remaining reservations-only period, guests who want to check out Oga’s will need to head there first (and ideally be at the front of the queuing crowd entering Galaxy’s Edge during the start of the time block). Even then, they are likely to be placed into a virtual queue that will page them back when it’s near time for them to enter.

The interior of Oga’s Cantina is pretty stunning.

The interior of Oga’s Cantina is pretty stunning.

Make it inside, though, and guests will find a sumptuously decorated bar that feels both technologically opulent and intimately seedy at the same time. A sweeping oval bar divides the round room in two, with plenty of eye candy and theming bits around the central bar itself. The bartenders—many of whom are deeply in some sort of character—serve a fascinating collection of cocktails and non-alcoholic drinks and snacks. Around the perimeter, several recessed booths offer spaces for larger groups, as well as nice angles for people watching. In between, a series of standing bars allows capacity for the in-betweens—medium-sized groups or singles and couples.

Layout aside, there is plenty to study in the cantina of Oga Garra, a mysterious Blutopian alien about whom little is known . Like everything else in Batuu, there is an almost overwhelming amount of detail throughout the interiors. The tap heads for some of the pre-mixed cocktails are IG-88 assassin droid heads. There are a couple of aquariums with a strange toad-like creature in each. Cannisters and jars full of exotic elixirs are scattered about. The light fixtures over the large group tables are exquisitely detailed. This is a cavern that has both lavish and scruffy qualities, and just being in the space is exciting.

Would like like essence of space toad in your beverage?

Would like like essence of space toad in your beverage?

The taps look pretty cool.

The taps look pretty cool.

Love these canisters.

Love these canisters.

A drink here will set guests back a pretty penny—er, credit. But they’re paying for both the Disney premium and for the atmosphere, especially since that atmosphere includes the grooving beats of DJ R-3X, now retired from his Star Tours piloting days and spinning dance grooves for a Star Wars-centric crowd. In fact, the jams are so loud that those in line will hear them thumping long before they set foot inside. R-3X seems to be having a fantastic time, though—even though this is his first time playing DJ as well. He seems much better suited, as his enthusiasm and excitement offer a sparkling charm that contrasts with the less scrupulous ambiance of the cantina in general.

The booths accommodate larger groups.

The booths accommodate larger groups.

Read Aurebesh? There are some fun Easter eggs for you!

Read Aurebesh? There are some fun Easter eggs for you!

Back to the drinks… The menu offers a nice variety of craft cocktails—most of them on the very sweet side of the drinking palate. Personally, the “Jet Juice” was my favorite. This bourbon-based cocktail comes in a relatively small glass, but it actually has a nice bite to it and a good depth of flavor, and there’s a little more liquid in the glass than first appears. The Jedi Mind Trick was a pretty blue, but it was too herbal for my own liking. If you’re not a person who likes, say, gin, this is probably not the drink for you. The Yub Nub is a non-surprisingly sweet rum drink, and it comes in a cool souvenir mug (thought guests can purchase the drink without the mug). The same goes for the Cliff Dweller, which is kid-friendly (non-alcoholic) and is offered in a pretty adorable Porg mug. Oga also has a selection of craft beers brewed by some local well known purveyors, and a couple of wine selections for those who aren’t cocktail sippers.

We didn’t get a chance to try solid foods here, but the Batuu Bits looked very interesting—a delightful mix of chips and crackers and nuts but fittingly eccentric looking. Oga’s Obsession was a gelatin-based [petri] dish with tapioca toppings. Oga also has a breakfast menu for those who make it in early enough in the morning.

Front of the regular menu.

Front of the regular menu.

Back of the regular menu.

Back of the regular menu.

The drinks are interesting looking, and the mugs are pretty cute. The drinks themselves seem to inspire different reactions from different people, so all I can really recommend is just try what you think you’ll like.

The drinks are interesting looking, and the mugs are pretty cute. The drinks themselves seem to inspire different reactions from different people, so all I can really recommend is just try what you think you’ll like.

Looking for a free souvenir? The coasters come in several design. And unlike the sporks in Docking Bay 7 (more on the later), they are allowed to be taken. It might take some convincing of the bartender, though. At least for some of them. When we went, our bartender was a bit surly and flippant, and it took us a couple of interactions to realize he was projecting a character. One can’t expect a bartender inside a haven for smugglers and bounty hunters and other shady characters to just be cheerful all the time, right?

Hey, it’s DJ R-3X!

Hey, it’s DJ R-3X!

There’s currently a 45 minute time limit for guests (although it was unclear to us how this was being enforced—probably just to those who appear to stay too long), and 2 drinks maximum per guest, which must be consumed within the bar. Although this now becomes the only place in Disneyland Park outside of Club 33 that serves alcohol, guests cannot just wander around Galaxy’s Edge with booze like at California Adventure. In that sense, there’s still a certain exclusivity. The 50-70 person capacity (rough estimate on my part) fills up early, so make sure to get a reservation as soon as you can if you want to visit!

Docking Bay 7 Food & Cargo

For those who can’t nab entry into Oga’s but still want to experience an intricately immersive and detailed themed space devoted to food service, Docking Bay 7 is the solution for you! The main restaurant in Galaxy’s Edge, this quick serve offers a fantastic variety of food inspired by cuisines around the world. Don’t expect to see standard theme park fare like burgers or chicken strips or hot dogs. Dishes here include a beef roast, a Southeast Asian-esque shrimp and cold noodles dish, smoked and spiced ribs, and other items that might feel more at home at a gastropub. For us, though, they were all pretty darn tasty.

Across from Millennium Force: Smuggler’s Run is Docking Bay 7, general food purveyor in the Black Spire Outpost.

Across from Millennium Force: Smuggler’s Run is Docking Bay 7, general food purveyor in the Black Spire Outpost.

Star Wars  fans will undoubtedly recognize that the numbers of these containers represent the years the original trilogy films came out.

Star Wars fans will undoubtedly recognize that the numbers of these containers represent the years the original trilogy films came out.

As much as we enjoyed the food, the interiors was the real wow factor. And that’s after the nifty scene one beholds outside, where a docked transport shuttle sits atop the restaurant tower bringing supplies. Wait long enough, and one might even catch it warming up its engines to blast off into the cosmos.

Welcome inside!

Welcome inside!

There are plenty of details to check out inside Docking Bay 7.

There are plenty of details to check out inside Docking Bay 7.

These are most interesting looking fish.

These are most interesting looking fish.

Inside, the props, lighting, and ceiling work present an immersive environment reminiscent of Tokyo Disney Sea caliber theming. Look around everywhere—and up too. The entire bay has the look of a supply depot in constant buzz. The aesthetic feels like an industrial space port, but the moody lighting brings extra drama (and color) to the premises.

There’s interesting theming around some of the container pods that double as dining booths too. Some of the local seafood / sea life can be seen, drying on a rack, awaiting further food preparation or preserving for longterm sustenance.

Ducting and ceiling grills offer an industrial look that still looks chic.

Ducting and ceiling grills offer an industrial look that still looks chic.

Love the lighting going on above!

Love the lighting going on above!

The area just outside Docking Bay 7 currently functions as the queue to get into the restaurant, since current popularity and demand means it’s often crowded. But in the future, if things die down and outdoor seating is provided, the deck will afford a great view overlooking the Millennium Falcon and Smuggler’s Run across the way. In any case, Docking Bay 7 is definitely worth a stop, not only for the food, but for the furnishings.

The Braised Shaak Roast is probably the most traditional of items offered here. The meat is plenty tender and very deeply flavorful.

The Braised Shaak Roast is probably the most traditional of items offered here. The meat is plenty tender and very deeply flavorful.

The Yobshrimp Noodle Salad offers a surprising heaping of shrimp and has a great, Vietnamese style tang to it.

The Yobshrimp Noodle Salad offers a surprising heaping of shrimp and has a great, Vietnamese style tang to it.

Ronto Roasters

Those looking for an even quicker serve establishment can check out Ronto Roasters, which serves only two items: a sausage and slaw wrap, and some turkey jerky (and also a morning breakfast menu). Ronto’s can be found at the end of the Batuu Marketplace, across from Dok-Ondar’s Den of Antiquities.

At the end of the Marketplace is Ronto Roasters.

At the end of the Marketplace is Ronto Roasters.

Its centerpiece is an old pod racing engine that has been repurposed into one heck of a barbecue, and the heat from the engine helps grill the meats that rotate on spits on either side—turned by a hapless former smelter droid called 8D-J8 that seems to very much recognize its unglamorous fate. Every now and then, steam billows out. My one minor quibble here is that the steam is not accompanied by any actual emission of heat, which would have given an extra layer of immersion. I understand why this wasn’t done, especially when one thinks of how it might be received on hot days (but maybe control the temperature?), but it would have been an even more appreciated layer of theming. But surrounded by a series of pod racing flags, the setting is still quite a photogenic one!

The detail in the roasting meat is pretty fantastic, though I have to admit that it looks more realistic in photograph than up close to the human eye (it still looks great, though).

The detail in the roasting meat is pretty fantastic, though I have to admit that it looks more realistic in photograph than up close to the human eye (it still looks great, though).

The actual restaurant is located behind the pod racing engine. Guests can place their order at the counter and wait. During our visit, we tried the Ronto Wrap, which was surprisingly delicious for such a simple-sounding dish. The grilled pork sausage was full of flavor and was complemented nicely by a helping of roasted pork. The peppercorn sauce provides a nice sweet heat, while the tangy slaw completes the ensemble with a satisfying bit of sour, similar to relish or sauerkraut. It’s a creative way of providing that could have been a typical bratwurst type of offering.

The Ronto Wrap is delicious. Definitely recommended!

The Ronto Wrap is delicious. Definitely recommended!

Milk Stand

Galaxy’s Edge also has a couple of small beverage outposts. The first is the [in]famous Milk Stand, situated across from a TIE Echelon combat shuttle and down the path from Oga’s Cantina. This is one of two places where guests can try Blue Milk (the other being at Oga’s itself) and the only place to sample Green Milk. Both are clearly Disney’s responses to Universal’s hit Butterbeer, and while the culinary creators at Disney tried to craft a beverage that would be refreshing on a warm day and tasty while retaining some amount of foreignness, the results have a little hit or miss.

Welcome to the Milk Stand! One of the stops in Batuu.

Welcome to the Milk Stand! One of the stops in Batuu.

The Milk Stand mobile order pick-up is to the left.

The Milk Stand mobile order pick-up is to the left.

The Blue Milk has been by far the more popular of the two drinks and fells like a safer choice for those debating between the two. It is a fruity slushy that carries some hints of a tropical Starburst candy, and if served chilled, does bear some amount of refreshment. But it’s also pretty sweet, and for many, it may be a little too sugary to bear. Meanwhile, the Green Milk will be enjoyed by those who like floral or herbal flavors. But those who do not will be loathe to taste this variation. On the day I tried it, it was also completely liquid rather than partially iced, contributing to a rather odd beverage texture that almost felt curdled. While the Green Milk does have its fans, they seem to be much less frequent than those who prefer Blue Milk, and I’ve also noticed quite a bit of people who don’t much care for either.

Hanging containers of Blue and Green Milk hang from above, to be dispensed into servings for guests.

Hanging containers of Blue and Green Milk hang from above, to be dispensed into servings for guests.

At $7.00, it’s probably worth it to try for the novelty factor, but I doubt I’ll be coming back for it like I would for Butterbear.

Blue Milk and Green Milk. Which do you like more?

Blue Milk and Green Milk. Which do you like more?

Refreshment Stand

The other grab-and-go watering hole is near the Frontierland and Fantasyland entrances—across from the entrance to Droid Depot. There isn’t an official name for this stop, through a frequent line marks its presence, but for those who want those cool custom Coca Cola and Sprite (and Dasani) bottles that have been custom made for Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, this is the place to get it.

Follow the line in this area to get cool Coke product bottles.

Follow the line in this area to get cool Coke product bottles.

This area is a bit of a repair shop for some land speeders.

This area is a bit of a repair shop for some land speeders.

A close-up of one of the speeders.

A close-up of one of the speeders.

A line of speeders rests in a garage area adjacent to the beverage stand, and the catwalks above also double as a stage space for a mini show that occurs in the afternoons featuring a Resistance run-in with the First Order. So the area still offers a nice double-duty bit of theming. But ultimately, the main draw here are the cool soda bottles. They’ll set you back more than an equivalent bottle off planet, though. A bottle currently goes for $5.50, while a regular (and very slightly larger) bottle is $4. But hey, at least you get a souvenir out of the bottle that looks like a thermal detonator?

These are basically Disney’s middle fingers to Universal’s claim that soda bottles don’t belong in hyper-themed environments.

These are basically Disney’s middle fingers to Universal’s claim that soda bottles don’t belong in hyper-themed environments.

It’s worth noting that Docking Bay 7, Ronto Roasters, and Milk Stand have mobile order available via the Disneyland App, though spots are limited and do run out. For those trying to get the most out of their visit, it might be smart to use mobile order and set a pick-up time, to minimize waiting in line.

Overall, as you can see from the photos, the level of detail and theming in just the restaurants is sky high at Galaxy’s Edge, just like it is on all other aspects of the land. This truly is the pinnacle of Disney design and theming. So much thought has been put into these environments, and the overall presentation really shines through. The sign of quality is how much effort goes into the details of even trivial matters, and for Disney to devote such effort its non-ride spaces shows just how high of a bar things on Batuu have raised. For those of us who haven’t been to Japan, this is the Tokyo Disney Sea quality that the more fortunate of us have raved about for years. It’s absolutely wonderful to see this ultra high level of craftsmanship make its way stateside!

Architect. Photographer. Disney nerd. Haunt enthusiast. Travel bugged. Concert fiend. Asian.